My son and daughter-in-law are divorcing. As a grandmother do I have visitation rights?

Grandparents may have legal rights in Rhode Island, regarding visitation, however, this is far from certain. In the event the grandparents and parents can come to an agreement regarding visitation, court intervention is generally not required. When no such agreement can be made, there are certain situations grandparents may be granted a court order allowing…

I’ve been estranged from my husband and want to remarry. Will Rhode Island grant me a Bifurcated divorce?

Bifurcation of divorce allows spouses to become legally divorced before the divorce details have been finalized. The option to remarry is the most common use of bifurcation; however, some couples seek a bifurcation to distinguish between marriage or pre-marriage property. Rhode Island does not permit bifurcation. The court will not handle the end of the…

Does Rhode Island divide property equally between the spouses during a divorce?

Rather than divide marital property equally, the State of Rhode Island General Laws require a Judge to divide it equitably. This means fairly and taking into account the good and bad behavior of both parties. Rhode Island generally considers “marital property” as any property—be it income, assets, real estate, or everyday items—that comes into possession…

Through the basic discovery process and asking direct and pointed questions, I was able to completely flip leverage of the matter, ultimately awarding my client 50% of the marital estate…

My client initially presented to me as a severe alcoholic, who had been abusive to his wife and had furthermore diminished the value of the Marital Estate due to his bad behavior and spotty work history. Obviously, at first glance I was quite concerned about my clients credibility and uncertain how I could make certain…

If my ex-spouse need to pick up our children at a different time from that stated in our custody agreement, do we need to alter the agreement, or is a verbal agreement enough?

As an attorney, my answer is almost always going to be “get it in writing.” While you may have the most amicable divorce in the world, you never know what the future may hold. Contracts fill the gaps left when human trust fails. If this is a one-time, or two-time situation, a verbal agreement might…